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Asset Protection Attorney Ike Devji Featured In Wall St. Journal

Asset Protection Attorney Ike Devji

Asset Protection Attorney Ike Devji

Phoenix, Arizona.

Asset Protection attorney Ike Devji was recently featured in a Wall Street Journal story about Offshore Asset Protection Trusts by Norb Vonnegut.

“It was pleasure to be part of Norb’s story, especially since he took the time to ask the right questions and do his homework, most reporters focus only on the sensational aspects of international or offshore planning. The fact is, the number of people who do it safely and legally every day outnumber those who do not, or who have been unfortunate enough to work with crooked non-lawyer promoters or bad lawyers by well over 1000 to 1.”

Devji has over a decade of experience devoted exclusively to being a “legal bodyguard” for billions of dollars worth of the wealth and assets of successful Americans and their families across the United Sates. He is a frequent speaker, author and educator, teaching CLE to other attorneys and financial advisors and CME (Continuing Medical Education) to doctors all over the United States and has authored hundreds of articles related to his actual daily legal practice with clients across the U.S.

Devji is quick to point out that there are many myths in the area of asset protection and that a tool is not a good tool for you unless it is a fit for your specific assets and fact pattern. He also believes that the best Asset Protection and Wealth Preservation planning is always a system of layers that includes a professional liability insurance program (not just one policy), risk management and legal tools.

You can read more about Ike Devji, Asset Protection and Wealth Preservation concepts and other related issues at www.ProAssetProtection.com

LINK: WSJ.com – Warding off predators with offshore trusts

 

Is Using Offshore Trusts for Asset Protection Still a Good Idea?

OFFSHORE ASSET PROTECTION TRUSTSThere are many specific methods for implementing Asset Protection planning, some work some don’t. We’ve always had a bias towards the use of offshore trust structures set up at the right time, in the right place with the right language.

Why? Because they take the discretion away from plaintiffs and their attorneys and create a point in time beyond which there is a predictable result.

This article is points out a couple of interesting details:

First, that nobody’s property is safe when Congress is in session.

Second, that a foreign trust in the right offshore jurisdiction is not subject generally to any U.S. judgments. 

See the Article From Newsmax.com  http://www.newsmax.com/Kleinfeld/Foreign-Trusts-Protect-Assets/2011/10/24/id/415473#ixzz34NBBXzyE

Need More info? See our index of “Asset Protection Trust” articles.

http://www.proassetprotection.com/category/asset-protection-trusts/

What’s the Difference Between a Will and a Trust and Which one Do I Need?

FAMILYAn estate plan is always necessary unless you want your estate to pass through “operation of law” which involves the long, uncertain, public and expensive process at your death with a stranger (the courts) deciding who gets everything you leave behind. This process often leads to heartache, delay and additional stress for those you leave behind, especially if they need the assets to sustain the family or if (all too commonly) family members may fight over what you leave behind.

A simple Will comes into effect at your death, controls the distribution of your assets (who gets what and when), and names who the Executor of your estate, the person you chose to be in charge and carry out your wishes, will be. A Will is the most basic form of estate planning and still requires the estate and its assets to go through the probate process, meaning that there will be an expense and delay in transferring assets at your death. A will is also public, meaning that a record of exactly what you left and to whom is available. In our view, it’s best suited for those with limited and simple assets, few or no heirs, and those with no minor children, dependents or pets that require specific care and guardianship guidance.

A Revocable Living Trust (RLT) on the other hand includes all the elements of a will, is established and can take title to a certain assets during your lifetime when you (and your spouse) can actively manage and change it. The RLT avoids probate, passes assets privately with little or no public record and typically includes a variety of sophisticated estate tax avoidance measures. The RLT also names and has specific guidelines for the Trustees of your estate, appoints Guardians for your children and dependents and can retain wealth and “sprinkle” income off the principal to your heirs. It allows a countless variety of sophisticated directives including what you want done if you have some sort of incapacitation condition like an illness or mental issue, typically referred to as “living will” and “health care power of attorney” provisions.

Finally, don’t forget that a well drafted trust has  a variety of checks and balances designed to protect the beneficiaries, the folks you are leaving behind. One such safeguard is called a “trust protector” a person designated with a specific set of powers including the power to remove and replace the trustee if the trustee is unwilling or incapable of serving under the terms of the trust or if the trustee is actually creating some active loss or problem. A trust can also protect what you leave from your heirs’ creditors and spouses if drafted with “spendthrift provisions” that say the trust proceeds are not to be used for paying judgment creditors and other debts.

If you don’t have an estate plan, or have had substantial changes to your family structure, wealth, children’s guardians, asset structure or gifting plans it’s time to get experienced help.

The basic estate planning tools noted above are only the tip of the iceberg. These are “death planning” tools, and do not protect assets during your life. A wide variety of Asset Protection, estate planning and family wealth management tools are available more easily and cost effectively than you know. Get personalized, professional help in figuring out what you need and  using it the best possible way.

What is an ILIT or Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust ? (and why should doctors and business owners use it)

ILITWe’ve previously devoted a number of discussions to the use of life insurance by physicians and business owners including a look at how to buy insurance and discussions of its specific uses and how much life insurance a doctor and his or her spouse should have. This week we take an introductory look at a legal structure that often accompanies life insurance in your estate plan, the Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust or ILIT.

What is an ILIT?

It is an irrevocable trust that, for the purposes of our introductory discussion, cannot be changed or amended outside few very specific exceptions. It is a formal legal structure that should be drafted by a qualified attorney familiar with both estate and gift tax laws. It is specially created to hold life insurance policies as well as cash and various other valuable assets that may be used to fund policy premiums or managed for other benefit of the named “beneficiaries” — the parties for whom the trust was set up.

The policy may be either purchased by the ILIT outright or later sold or gifted to the trust by the person creating the trust, known as the “grantor.” Finally, the grantor appoints a trust manager who can make discretionary distributions and who helps manage the trust known as a “trustee.” The trustee cannot also be a grantor and despite the common practice by many estate planners, in my opinion, should not be a beneficiary. In other words, it should be a third party.

What does an ILIT do?

In the majority of cases it’s used for a basic estate-planning reason — to put the proceeds of a large life insurance policy outside the taxable estate of the grantor. This means that the death benefit can be used to either supplement the value of the estate or to help pay any estate taxes that might be due by purchasing illiquid assets that might otherwise have to be sold to pay the taxes, as just one of several examples.

Why Can’t a Grantor also be a Trustee?

We avoid this practice for the reason that is at the core of this column, asset protection, as we do not want a beneficiary who has the power to make discretionary distributions of trust assets to be forced to make a distribution to his or her own creditors.

The ILIT provides creditor and principal protection of the assets in the trust (including any death benefit received upon the death of the insured) in several ways:

1. It protects the assets in the trust from estate tax by excluding them from the grantor’s taxable estate.

2. It can protect the cash value and death benefit of a life insurance policy from creditors. Some states protect cash values to a very high, even unlimited, dollar amount, while others do not; a properly drafted trust easily achieves this result.

3. It protects the death benefit and other trust assets from the creditors of the beneficiaries themselves, including future spouses. So, if the beneficiaries of your estate face a future lawsuit, bankruptcy, or divorce this asset will be protected from those exposures or even from the beneficiary themselves if they are minors or have other significant exposures like mental or physical disabilities, addiction problems, or other behavioral issues.

4. It protects present assets intended to go to the beneficiaries, including plain old cash you may intend to fund the policy with now or in the future, from the grantor’s creditors. Said simply, it allows the irrevocable present transfer of assets into a “safe” that the trustee can use to pay for the insurance premiums in the future.

This is a very general introduction to a tool that can be exceptionally complex and is not a recommendation that every doctor or business owner out there needs or is even qualified for an ILIT. As always, a good tool is only “good” if it is a fit for your very subjective goals and needs. We will continue our discussion of this topic in the near future, including a look at how assets in an ILIT can be protected from your creditors and still accessible to you during your lifetime through the use of loans.

 

How To Document Property Damage Claims at Your Business or Medical Practice: Asset Protection

Slide1As we’ve seen across the United States over the last year, severe weather, disasters and even intentional acts of vandalism can cause financially devastsing  property damage. Below are tips on how to document and pursue claims with your insurance company to enforce your rights under your  property and casualty policy.

• Step One: Actually having adequate insurance

Check on your property damage dollar limits to make sure they are adequate for the actual value of the building (and its contents) and make sure you understand important policy details like the difference between replacement cost (the dollar amount needed to replace a damaged item with one of similar kind and quality, without depreciation) and actual cash value (which pays only the amount needed to replace the item at its current market value).

• Step Two: Document everything — this is now a legal issue

As is reasonably possible, document the damage to your structure including an inventory of any damaged items you can immediately spot, including medical equipment, fixtures, signage, and office equipment, as well as documenting any appointments that had to be cancelled and other loss of revenue opportunities related to the damage. Write it down at the time so your recollection is fresh and accurate, and support that writing with pictures, video, etc. If you have a smart phone you have the ability to do this at all times.

• Step Three: Protect the property

Most polices have language that requires you to take reasonable measures to prevent further damage after it has come to your attention. This may include addressing covering damage in roof, walls, doors, and windows with temporary shelter. Your insurance policy may exclude further damage to your property if you have not taken reasonable steps to secure the property. Your insurance company will generally reimburse you for all reasonable costs to protect your property, so document everything and keep receipts for all expenses. Avoid any possible permanent repairs and major expenses until your carrier’s claims adjuster has assessed the damage.

• Step Four: Report the claim

Call and report the damage to your insurance agent or representative to start the claim process. Get a claim number issued immediately so you are in the system and have something to refer to on all future calls and correspondence; without a claim number you do not exist. It is vital to document everything. Keep a written log of all phone calls and correspondence, including the names of the people you spoke to, their telephone extensions and e-mail addresses and make copies of all correspondence sent to or received from your insurance company. Many insurance carriers intentionally obfuscate contact numbers and provide an endless maze of dead-end fax and phone numbers, in an effort to delay timely processing of claims, or “paperwork you away.” So if an insurance company employee or adjuster gives you such numbers to use, try to get them in writing.

• Step Five: Demand an adjuster and complete any forms they require

Your insurance company may use a “proof of loss” form or will simply have you make a formal verbal statement on the phone that may be recorded. You are not a contractor; so don’t give opinions on the scope of the damage, costs, and etc. It will likely be used against you later, if you do. Report the damage you’ve been able to see, any remediation you’ve had to perform, and any help you need with further remediation. Inform them you’ve documented the claim with a list and photos. The adjuster should perform a thorough evaluation of the damage, so check their inspection report, when it happens, against your own list to make sure they haven’t intentionally or accidentally omitted any losses. If the adjuster is unable to complete a thorough inspection due to time constraints he may be forced to “scope the loss.” This is a brief inspection of the damage with a second visit necessary to complete the inspection.

If your carrier gives you the run around on any issues, does not timely respond, or most likely, fails to make you an adequate settlement offer, report the issue to a claims manager and support your case with documentation, estimates, and the photos you took. You have specific rights under the laws of the insurance codes of your state; know them. They are typically easy to find on every state’s department of insurance website and will spell out your rights and the carrier’s legal obligations in plain English.

This article originally appeared at www.physicianspractice.com where Ike Devji has written over 135 articles on buisness law, risk managment and asset protection for doctors. 

Arizona Asset Protection Attorneys Featured at 17th Annual Wealth Protection Conference, May 2014

Attorneys Charlie Davis and Ike Devji will be speaking at the 17th Annual Wealth Protection Conference on May 9 and 10 in Mesa Arizona.

From Left, Attorneys Charlie Davis and Ike Devji

From Left, Attorneys Charlie Davis and Ike Devji

Topics covered at the conference will include:

How To Protect Your Assets For Generations,   How to Safely and Legally Use Offshore Trusts and Banks,  Common Fatal Flaws and Misconceptions That Cost Successful People Everything,  Asset Protection Blueprint,   Estate Planning Tips,   Must Have Assets for 2014, Tools To Help You Put Your Business Into Hyper Growth Mode, Profiting During the Impending Dollar Collapse,   Where Energy is Headed & How to Profit, Taxpayers Rights and Abuse Prevention.

Take a look at the Conference website at www.wealthprotectionconf.com and sign up today to secure your spot. If you want to bring a colleague, spouse, child, or a friend the price of a second ticket is half price.

Charlie Davis is the founding partner of Davis Miles McGuire Gardner (DMMG) in Tempe Arizona and has decades of experience in dealing with business owners and other successful Americans on issues related to real estate, tax law and advanced business planning including Asset Protection.

See more on Charlie here: http://www.davismiles.com/attorney/charles-e-davis/

Ike Devji has over a decade of national legal practice devoted solely to Asset Protection and Wealth Preservation and helps protects billions of dollars in personal assets for client base that includes thousands of businesses owners and physicians among others. Ike joined Davis Miles McGuire Gardner earlier this year to help create formal practice groups in theses areas.

See more on Ike here: http://www.davismiles.com/attorney/ike-z-devji-j-d/

About the DMMG Asset Protection Practice group:

http://www.davismiles.com/practice-areas/asset-protection/

 

 

 

Invoicing Scams Targeting Medical Practices, Other Businesses

FRAUDContinuing the theme of our last few pieces on holiday scams this week we take a look at the burgeoning industry of invoicing scams, that is, billing people for goods and services they never received, didn’t order, or don’t need. As with many of the other forms of fraud we’ve covered they peak at year-end when criminals know you and your office are busy and working with limited time.

How Bad is It?

It’s bad. By some reports this form of fraud costs medical practices, businesses, and individuals like you billions of dollars a year for goods and services they never get. The scammers are sophisticated, often mimic known, real organizations in their names and presentation, and use scary language that makes you believe you will be subject to fines, penalties, collections, and even legal actions if you don’t send them a check. They often send mailings out in large numbers, covering whole states and regions. The biggest ones even have corresponding websites and call centers that will follow up, bill, and collect from your accounting department.

What Are the Common Scam Bills They Send Out?

Everything under the sun. Common examples include goods and services like light bulbs, cleaning, maintenance, fines, and other recurring expenses your business may naturally incur. Given the large number of changes in taxes, labor laws, and health-insurance compliance issues for your staff under the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, scammers are also targeting employers with false compliance and violation scare notices. A prime example is a notice a client of mine recently received from a “LABOR STANDARDS” organization in Phoenix. The invoice is conspicuously marked FINAL NOTICE in big red letters and says in bold, “Failure to comply with 2013 labor law requirements may lead to government fines and/or  audits” and demands a “fee” of $295 and states “NOW DUE.” Careful reading reveals that it is not a bill, but a solicitation that (in my opinion) intentionally looks exactly like a bill for which they’ll send you some posters that you are not required to buy by law. The state’s attorney general issued a warning about this company specifically after the notice came to my attention. The law requires that the disclaimers be as large as the largest typeface used in the letter but they usually aren’t, so read carefully.

What are the risks?

Aside from the obvious, paying for something you don’t want, need, or never saw, the scammers now have either a credit card number and all required identifying details or your checking account number. While not all of those involved in invoicing scams further misuse that information, many do and the first payment may be just the beginning of a long trail of fraud and identity theft. The end of the year is a great time to check your credit as well and immediately and formally dispute any unauthorized accounts and charges.

Red Flags to Watch Out For

• Invoices from unfamiliar vendors

 Billing from out of state or out of the U.S. for services rendered locally

• Poorly constructed websites with navigation and spelling errors

• Account numbers that are different from your usual ones, even with vendors you actually use

• Lack of verifiable contact info and phone numbers

• Unusual amounts

• Duplicate bills and invoice numbers

• P.O. Box return addresses

• Homemade invoices or photocopies without supporting documents

Breaking News

I redacted some additional detail to warn you about something else that came to my attention while I was writing this piece, a new virus that locks you out of your own computer and demands bitcoins or other untraceable forms of online payment as extortion for releasing your files. In many cases, even after you’ve paid, they hold your files hostage and make you pay more. According to reports, the scam often starts when you open an attachment to an e-mail that pretends to be a UPS or FedEx tracking notice. It’s easy to get people to click on at a time of year when you are sending and expecting many packages, including your own online shopping. Be wary and don’t open attachments; real organizations rarely send them and your antivirus is not 100 percent effective against such malicious software.

This article originally appeared at www.PhysiciansPractice.com , the nation’s leading practice management resource, where Asset Protection Attorney Ike Devji has written over 125 articles.  See them here: http://www.physicianspractice.com/authors/ike-devji-jd

Lawsuits Against Doctors Are For More Than Just Medical Care Delivered

PHYSICIAN AND HEALTHCARE EXECUTIVE LIABILITYGetting back to the asset protection roots of our discussions, today we examine a variety of liabilities for doctors that are not strictly related to the “standard of care” at the center of most malpractice claims.

If you joined us last week, we discussed so-called “defensive medicine” and the idea that limiting diagnostics based on what third parties want to pay for can lead to tragic results for patients and their doctors. There’s a logical nexus between the most common cause of medical malpractice lawsuits and the issue of what is subjectively enough diagnostics and testing. Approximately 35 percent of all such claims are related to “failure to diagnose” including the closely related claim of “misdiagnosis,” according to a 2013 medical malpractice study.

RELATED:  So-called “Defensive Medicine” is often Good Medicine and “Best Practice” for Doctors http://www.proassetprotection.com/2014/03/defensive-medicine-is-often-good-medicine-and-best-practice-for-doctors/

As serious and obvious as this exposure is to doctors, the actual care delivered is only one of many reasons that patients sue doctors. Below we examine some recent examples that range from shocking to arguable, but in most cases, it is actually the doctor’s fault.

In one recent case that displays a shocking lapse of judgment, a California anesthesiologist put stickers on a patient’s face to make a mustache, gang tears, and etc., during surgery. Upon being shown the photo, the patient sued and her lawsuit seeks damages from the hospital, the anesthesiologist, and his entire medical group for violation of privacy, infliction of emotional distress, and other allegations. Her attorney said the plaintiff was forced to leave her job ordering and maintaining supplies for the hospital’s operating rooms because she was “ridiculed and humiliated while under anesthesia.” While this may seem funny, I know plenty of attorneys that would use an incident like this as de facto evidence of the surgical team’s ineptitude in the event of any adverse patient outcome (fortunately, not a claim here) and I’d bet plenty of courts would agree.

An even more egregious case is a $1.5 million suit in Cook County, Ill., that names Dr. V. Puppala, the Feinberg School of Medicine, and the Northwestern Memorial Hospital. A patient is claiming invasion of privacy and infliction of emotional distress according to court documents. The patient was allegedly admitted to the hospital in extremely intoxicated condition and was then allegedly photographed by the attending ER physician who photographed her crying, passed out, with an IV, etc., and then not only posted her pictures on social media but later refused to take them down when requested to do so by hospital security. The plaintiff patient is a Northwestern student that had the “potential to someday work for Fortune 500 companies, which may now not occur because of said photographs,” according to the complaint.

In perhaps a more defensible case, a New York physician was sued by a patient for testing her for HIV and telling her she had it without her express consent. The treating physician was concerned about her white blood cell count after her condition failed to improve despite continued treatment and he had blood drawn and had the test done, presumably to protect her health. Unfortunately, this is a case of “strict liability” as New York law requires specific informed consent, counseling after testing, patient education, and a litany of other conditions that control how this testing is administered, regardless of the doctor’s actual intent. Given the patient’s history of non-compliance, the idea that she would have gone through all the required steps is frankly ludicrous, but I imagine a “failure to diagnose” claim would have followed in the future had he not acted and had her condition continued undiagnosed. What’s the right answer? Hard to say in case like this, perhaps having her sign a strongly written (i.e. by a healthcare lawyer) waiver of the test would have helped.

No compliance plan can protect doctors where shocking conduct, lack of common sense, or a failure to follow state law controls the claim. As always, effective asset protection for doctors involves doing the right thing in terms of policies, best practices, insurance and legal structures, and compliance for all medical personnel in the chain of care including staff and enforcing the same for your physician partners, who hold the future of your practice in their hands as well every time they see a patient.

Income Tax Deductions Doctors and Business Owners Often Overlook

CPA TJ CASEY

CPA TJ CASEY

As tax day bears down on us with increasing momentum, I turned to a CPA for some tips on commonly overlooked deductions. As always, legal and tax advice given in this forum can only be general information and can never be considered individual tax advice, so discuss these issues with your own CPA now, while meaningful discourse and even some legal tax avoidance planning is still possible.

CPA TJ Casey is experienced in working with doctors through his firm TJ Casey CPA in Mesa, Ariz. and shared the following tips. Hopefully you have your own great CPA that you can turn to and who is helping your practice stay on schedule with its own business-planning calendar.

Here are Casey’s tips:

• Take advantage of reduced income tax from participating in employee-sponsored retirement plan, generally 401(k) plans.

• Keep track of your personal medical expense deductions for possible deductions on state tax returns. Many people don’t bother to keep track of medical expenses due to federal ceilings being so high that medical is generally disallowed. For instance, in our state, Arizona, all deductions for this expense may be allowable

• Take advantage of any available state income tax credits — allocating your tax dollars to working poor, private schools, and public schools; in some states to the tune of about $2,800 each year.

• Mileage deductions for self-employed doctors and practice owners. Most people don’t keep a log, and end up not being able to justify a deduction that could be a $0.55 per mile deduction depending on your state of residence.

• Not reporting when you should. Failure to report foreign bank account and security ownership (including through trust and other legal entities) can cost a doctor up to 50 percent of the account value if discovered by the IRS.

Note from Ike: Although we have discussed the use of a variety of offshores tools by doctors in this column and I personally use them with thousands of clients nationwide, all such tools are tax neutral, and are fully reported to the IRS. The penalties for abusing these tools, as many doctors are prone to do, (often at the suggestion of unskilled or unscrupulous tax plan salesmen and financial advisors), are exceptionally onerous and carry fines of hundreds of thousands of dollars and multi-year jail sentences. Full tax disclosure means never having to say, “I’m sorry.”

• Missing Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) credit carry forwards and missing other tax attribute carry forwards like loses from previous years you may not have been able to fully use then.

• Misreporting issues like failing to properly report debt relief income from real estate transactions like short sales or other write-offs where you escaped the full liability of financing debt.

• Paying unnecessary penalties for failure to properly and timely pay estimated tax payments (do your really want to leave a tip?)

As Casey explained to me, none of this individually may be that exciting from a numbers perspective, but not letting a number of these things get away from you has a substantial cumulative effect.

Given the time of year and the damage severe winter storms have done to many parts of the country I discovered a few other timely and important deductions to consider:

• Deductions for damages and losses due to disaster (and theft and other losses). Again this is fact-specific but we’ve seen large numbers of practices affected over the last few years by tornadoes, hurricanes, and now severe winter storms. Those in official federal disaster areas get some level of automatic qualification, but get professional advice and don’t try to deduct things that actually weren’t a loss (i.e. normal wear and tear) and for which you may have been fully reimbursed by insurance, as one prohibited example.

• Deductions for caring for a parent or other dependent individual. The IRS may allow you take a specific deduction of up to $3,000 known as the “Dependent Care Credit”  for the care of a parent or other individual that meets certain minimum qualifying criteria and who is incapable of caring for themselves.

• Deductions of a variety of common and recurring business expenses including:

• Financial advisory and financial management fees including bank fees of various types;

• The cost of last year’s tax returns;

• Property taxes you may have paid on any time share property (doctors love these); and

• Qualifying personal and business legal expenses.

Again, please explore these issues only with professional tax help in the context of your own business and personal tax returns.

This article originally appeared at www.PhysiciansPractice.com , the nation’s leading practice management resource, where Asset Protection Attorney Ike Devji has written over 125 articles.  See them here: http://www.physicianspractice.com/authors/ike-devji-jd

CPA TJ Casey has experience ranging from estate planning services coordinator in a local law firm to “Big 4″ and local public accounting. He provides his tax clients an added benefit with his extensive background and experience in estate planning both from a tax and trust administration perspective. TJ graduated from Arizona State University with his Bachelors Degree in Accounting in 2001 and Masters Degree in Taxation in 2002. He is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the Arizona Society of Certified Public Accountants, and is a current member of the Board of Directors for the East Valley Adult Resources Foundation. In his spare time, TJ enjoys fishing, camping, attending his children’s sporting events, and playing guitar in a Phoenix based rock band. Learn more about him at: http://tjcaseycpa.com/

Asset Protection Attorney Ike Devji featured on Esq. Resource Radio

Slide1Attorney Ike Devji was a featured guest for a 60 minute interview on Esq. Resource Radio in Scottsdale, Arizona with host Frank Lopo recently.

The interview introduced the idea of Asset Protection, common Asset Protection mistakes and misconceptions, the role of liability insurance and a number of other issues that successful individuals like doctors and business owners should consider in their own legal and financial planning.

You can hear the entire interview at the link below.